Beyond the Secular

The young secular man
fervently tells me he only
believes
in objects he can see
with his own eye
touch
with his finger
smell
with his nose
taste
with his tongue
hear
with his ear.

But he’s missing
matters of some importance.
That fail his criteria.

Perhaps that’s why the word
abstract was invented.

Beyond belief
there is
love
beauty
friendship
art
nature
creativity
happiness
sadness
joy
the scientific method
and so much more!

Of course the effects of these
can all be measured
in some indirect way
perhaps even scientifically
though they’ll be distinct and unique
to each subject.

We all apply our own experience.

But these
though weighing no pounds or even grams
are messy
and
make us human
and cannot be
discarded or ignored without
consequence.

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lego my eggnog please

there is no l in eggnog
no n in lego
but all the others are shared

and rid of the l and n (and duplicates)
we’re left with only an ego
intact

mere coincidence?

i think not

consider:

it is possible

to float lego upon eggnog
to drink eggnog from lego
(and verily, for connoisseurs) to construct a lego mug within which to swill eggnog
to philosophize that if you nog eggs then you must lego of them at some point
—and left long enough
to lego another lego can be forever cemented with drying eggnog

why haven’t the conspiracy theorists noticed?
clearly there is a conspiracy afoot
to quash the lego/eggnog conspiracy theory itself
by them

i’ll not let go
exactly
gone is my
gregariousness
i’ll watch you
as
i play with my lego
sip my eggnog
i’ll watch you
too

Poetry is

I started reading Thinking and Singing edited by Tim Lilburn, one of the poets I saw read on Monday. His writing is extremely dense. I really liked the following quote:

Poetry and long talk: oddly, in effect, the two appear equivalent: both are beckoning ways in; both are maieutic, lifting to the tongue latent things, lit things no one planned to say. Neither, it seems, fully trusts its elder brother, systematic though; each will upend it; sometimes, however, poetry or dialectic will use system to draw what needs saying further along. It can seem with such talk that the conversation itself often is doing the thinking, the speakers contributing simply their confusion, their pressing to know, each listening for where the talk wants to go, attempting to “hear” the watercourse it’s found. Many poets say that poetry, too, is largely listening, that what is wanted is a kind of negative attention, an alert emptiness …
–taken from Tim Lilburn’s preface to Thinking and Singing: Poetry and the Practice of Philosophy

“Largely listening” and “alert emptiness”. Wow. Apt.