Delving Deeper

Turtle, the stand up comic,
had begun his shows each of the last Saturdays
with this:
“It would be
so easy
to play trump
for the silly win
but I like
delving deeper”
and then would hold out his clawed upper limbs and
pretend like he was digging.

The crowds howled at first
but schtick lasts only so long
and Turtle could only stay standing for so long
anyway.

So he’s been looking for fresh ideas.

“In truth, Truth!” He sighs to his friend Possum
at the Laughing Lemur
the only bar that stayed open late enough
for late night comedians.
“The best humor comes from Truth.”

Possum nodded his head vigorously
wishing he was dozing on some limb
and alternately loathing that he wasn’t as
spry for late nights as he once was.
“Ain’t it the truth.”

“That’s what I just said: get your own darn material.”
Turtle banged his fermented romaine bottle
down hard on the bar.
They both laughed loud making Roach, the bartender,
swing big oblong glossy eyes and bent antennae up
from his paper.

“We’re victims of old age, Tur. Gone
are the days when we were choking the joke out
of every bit of life we came across. We’ve got to make way
for the young blood.”

“Speak for yourself. You’re three quarters
done but I’ve got a serious life expectancy.”

“Ouch. I burn fast and bright you geezer,
and you’ll never know if I’m really dead anyway.”

Turtle grinned. “That last fake funeral you
had got me good, I’ll admit. I still can’t believe
you waited until my speech was almost done.”

Possum laughed with high chirping long
enough for Roach to slide off his chair and compound
eye them both.

“Last call fellas.”

Turtle sighed. “Might as well make it good, then.
Two single scotch malts for my friend and I.”

They threw them back and staggered out
leaning a little
on each other.

Tomorrow would be a brand new day.
Anything could happen and that’s the truth.

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Next Stop Wonderland

This 1998 movie from Director Brad Anderson was a surprise. It is a fresh, Woody-Allenesque drama (but set in Boston) that had me laughing and interested the entire 104 minutes.  In fact, my wife and I enjoyed it so much we watched it twice this week. And we’ve talked about buying a copy for our collection.

It’s about a young nurse (Hope Davis) who is dumped by a radical activist (played by a young Philip Seymour Hoffman). Her mother (the very funny Holland Taylor) places an ad in the Personals for her and hilarity ensues while she keeps just missing a young plumber-turned-Marine-Biologist (Alan Gelfant).

A very enjoyable flick for the whole family.

Run Fatboy Run

David Schwimmer directed this Michael Ian Black (of Stella fame) story. The principal Simon Pegg and Black wrote the screenplay. This was a very enjoyable movie with a lot of unusual humour. Sure the basic plot is simple and predictable, but it’s how the talented actors get from A to B that is a lot of fun.
Simon Pegg is excellent at creating a sympathetic character to watch in Dennis Doyle, someone who has trouble finishing anything. I think Pegg did even better here than in Hot Fuzz another of his films that I own. Although Hot Fuzz was filmed in the same year (2007) I found the growth of Dennis far more believable than the change in Nicholas Angel who goes from strictly by the rules and neurotic lawman quickly to someone too much like Harry Callahan for my taste. I think that film would have benefited from the character restraint in Run Fatboy Run.
Beside Pegg I liked Dylan Moran‘s character (the irrepressible but lovable and funny Gordon) best. Harish Patel‘s Mr. Goshdashtidar was a lovingly done but stereotypic Indian-man-in-England.
Other actors who were good were: Matthew Fenton (Jake), Hank Azaria (Whit) and Thandie Newton (Libby).
A very much recommended comedy for adults and definitely not suitable for a pre-teen sleep-over, son (you know who you are).

Two Mules for Sister Sara

This library rental was a treat:  both a comedy and an Eastwood action film (1970).  Directed by Don Siegel who also did Dirty Harry and co-starring Shirley MacLaine, this is wonderfully full of twists and features the real historical even of The Franco-Mexican War (1862-1866) as a backdrop.
Highly recommended for those interested in a fun movie but it ain’t for young kids.

Reaper

This is a new sitcom, filmed in Burnaby, BC. It isn’t about the same type of reaper as we saw in Dead Like Me which I reviewed earlier, the main character (Sam Oliver played by Bret Harrison) is working for the Devil (exceedingly well done by Ray Wise). I’ve only seen the first episode so I don’t know how the story progresses but it seems that Sam has to retrieve escapees from Hell. It sounds challenging and with friends like Bert ‘Sock’ Wysocki (Tyler Labine is fantastic) it is but this series seems to work excellently well. Just the right mix. I definitely want to see more! Just as engaging as Dead Like Me was.
Highly recommended.